What Every Good Fundraiser Needs

Do you know what this is? It’s my happy place—a magic drawer stocked with cards for every occasion. And every good fundraiser should have one.

Great stewardship means having your donors top of mind. Is it their birthday? Tell them to eat cake. Are they welcoming their first grandbaby? Say congrats! Moving to their dream retirement home? Send them an abundance of good wishes. Whatever it is, let them know you’re thinking of them.

But can’t I do that in an email? Of course you can, but that’s too easy. You could type that email in your sleep. With a card, you’re telling your donor that they deserve a special kind of greeting. One that takes time, effort, and most importantly, thought. It’s touches like these that move your relationships forward and deepen the bond between your donors and your organization.

And want to know what card I recently added to my collection? An anniversary card. No, not the wedding kind, the kind to celebrate donor anniversaries. “Five years ago today, you changed the world. That day you made your first gift, a gift that we still remember and appreciate…”

You’re still here? What are you waiting for already? Find a drawer and buy some cards. Happy stewarding!

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7 thoughts on “What Every Good Fundraiser Needs

  1. Such an easy simple thing to do that reaps HUGE rewards. I also personally like picking up the phone at the end of the fiscal year (& other times) and thanking your donors. Thank them for helping you through another year of making a difference.

  2. Shanon, I like your idea for a “magic drawer,” and I especially like the sentiment behind it. In my book, “Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing” and, most recently today when I taught part of the CFRE Review Course, I’ve touched on the value of personal touches like a handwritten thank-you note. Because so many nonprofits do such a poor job of building relationships, those that make any kind of effort will really stand-out. Thanks for setting an excellent example!

  3. we have a drawer in my office, though most of are cards are less expensive (our donors will speak up if our stuff looks too nice). we also keep simple sympathy cards on hand so when we find out someone passes away, we can write their widow/er immediately and not have to make an emergency run to the store, where you inevitably have to read dozens before you find one that’s appropriate

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